“I do not want to see a book business dominated by data because I prefer the old way, a book business run on the only metric that matters: love.”

Favorite Essays of 2013

If you’re like me, you probably have some time off over the next two weeks. Maybe you’re looking for something to read on a flight home for the holidays. Or maybe you just want to look at another end of the year list. In the spirit of all the above, I’ve put together a reading list of some of my favorite essays from 2013. These range from profiles on professors and musicians, essays on gentrification and urban development, to pieces on artificial intelligence and driverless cars. Think of it as a top ten list for essays. The list is fairly diverse so I’m sure you’ll find something of interest that you can spend reading over the holidays. Enjoy!

Read More

I recently finished reading Jennifer Egan’s brilliant novel, A Visit from the Goon Squad after Michael Rock included it on his Designers & Books list. Of the book, Rock says:


  The most contemporary book on my list included primarily because I admire the complex structure of the narrative. Egan moves so deftly between time periods and genres that the intricacy of the interrelationships is almost not apparent at first. An extremely designed novel.
  
  A Visit from the Goon Squad is almost diagrammatic in the way it reshuffles the chronological narrative and interlocks the plot elements. It’s both intricate and finely wrought. Egan also adopts a collage method where in she moves between various genres and tenses (and even includes a chapter written in PowerPoint).


Rock even had his students at Yale attempt to diagram it for one their projects, as shown above. When looking at that diagram, you can see how complex her structure is.



In an interview for Bomb Magazine, Egan uses Chuck Close as a metaphor for how he structured the novel—when viewed closely, it’s a series of short stories, but it is only when you pull away that you can fully understand the bigger picture:


  I imagined the book was sort of like those art projects you do as kids when the teacher makes you put a grid over a drawing and every person in the class is responsible for a little square, you match them all together and then, Oh my God! It’s the same drawing. But in my mind, the way to do it was more of a Chuck Close painting, in that every small square was its own individual work, and yet they all added up to something bigger. I often actually have a visual idea of what I’m trying to do, which is odd because I’m not visual. I’m really a horrific draftswoman.


Highly recommended.

I recently finished reading Jennifer Egan’s brilliant novel, A Visit from the Goon Squad after Michael Rock included it on his Designers & Books list. Of the book, Rock says:

The most contemporary book on my list included primarily because I admire the complex structure of the narrative. Egan moves so deftly between time periods and genres that the intricacy of the interrelationships is almost not apparent at first. An extremely designed novel.

A Visit from the Goon Squad is almost diagrammatic in the way it reshuffles the chronological narrative and interlocks the plot elements. It’s both intricate and finely wrought. Egan also adopts a collage method where in she moves between various genres and tenses (and even includes a chapter written in PowerPoint).

Rock even had his students at Yale attempt to diagram it for one their projects, as shown above. When looking at that diagram, you can see how complex her structure is.

In an interview for Bomb Magazine, Egan uses Chuck Close as a metaphor for how he structured the novel—when viewed closely, it’s a series of short stories, but it is only when you pull away that you can fully understand the bigger picture:

I imagined the book was sort of like those art projects you do as kids when the teacher makes you put a grid over a drawing and every person in the class is responsible for a little square, you match them all together and then, Oh my God! It’s the same drawing. But in my mind, the way to do it was more of a Chuck Close painting, in that every small square was its own individual work, and yet they all added up to something bigger. I often actually have a visual idea of what I’m trying to do, which is odd because I’m not visual. I’m really a horrific draftswoman.

Highly recommended.

Four novels I want all my friends to read

2013 has shaped up to be my Year Of The Novel. Historically preferring nonfiction books, I’ve found myself reading more novels this year than previous years and my to-read pile is decidedly fiction lately, meaning the trend doesn’t appear to be ending soon.

Near the end of last year, I read Robin Sloan’s excellent debut novel Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore which set me on a search for more books like it. Since then, I’ve stumbled upon a few and I’ve loved each one in their own ways. These are decidedly modern stories—they are describing what it is like to live today, in 2013. They reference Google and Facebook and Apple. They are about working in technology but more importantly they are stories about the people behind that technology—they are people I relate to—people I know—working at start ups, living in New York and San Francisco, talking about typefaces, and growing up and falling in love.

These are four novels that have meant a lot to me in the last year. If we’ve talked in the last few months, there’s a good chance I’ve brought one of these up to you. They are stories that are familiar to me, that I can relate to in profound ways. I’m sharing them here because I think you’ll find them as engrossing and entertaining and thoughtful as I did.

Read More

“There were noises made briefly, a few years ago, about the idea that we were living in a post-literate world, in which the ability to make sense out of written words was somehow redundant, but those days are gone: words are more important than they ever were: we navigate the world with words, and as the world slips onto the web, we need to follow, to communicate and to comprehend what we are reading.”

The New Yorker Profiles

When I lived in New York, I was a regular subscriber and reader of The New Yorker and would get excited every Monday to see it in my mailbox. I’d read it cover-to-cover on the trains to and from work but the Profiles—the weekly feature on a notable individual’s life—were always my favorite.

I tend to get obsessed with certain people—usually creative polymaths, of sorts—and devour everything I can about them. I realized today, while reading this week’s profile on Twitter and Square founder Jack Dorsey, that when I become interested in someone, the first thing I do is see if The New Yorker has profiled them.

I thought I’d share a few of my favorites from over the years. I naturally bend towards the creative and business people, but hopefully you’ll see a nice variety here. The best profile, in my opinion, is the one that I can’t stop reading but as soon as I’ve finished, I’m inspired to get up and work on my own craft a little bit harder than I did before.

Here are a few of my favorites, in no particular order:

“The writer comes across as so big-hearted, so in love with the world – the ancient world, the con­tem­po­rary world, the hi-tech world, the world of yel­low­ing scrolls, in love with love, in love with friend­ship, you name it – and the reader is swept along by his pos­i­tive enthu­si­asm”

That’s George Saunders talking about Robin Sloan’s book Mr. Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore. That, to me, feels like the highest compliment one can receive—big-hearted and in love with the world.

(Also, if you haven’t read Mr. Penumbra yet, you simply must.)

“In other contexts such as film, literature, and theater, often criticism is the equivalent of reviewing recent works. In the context of the internet, what would a comprehensive review of a website or a new app consist of? How has it come to pass that “usability” criteria are framed through the protestant-corporate idiom of Jacob Nielsen—and still remain unchallenged? Can we popularize highly technical software reviews? What would form a good app review, beyond a description of its functionality?”
“The object we call a book is not the real book, but its seed or potential, like a music score. It exists fully only in the act of being read; and its real home is inside the head of the reader, where the seed germinates and the symphony resounds. A book is a heart that only beats in the chest of another.”
Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby

A book is a book is a book

A book is words. But is it just words? No, it can’t be. It has to be more than words. If it’s just words then I’m making a book right now, with each word I sit here typing. Clickity clackety, type letter, type word, type letter, type word, book!

So a book has to be more than just words. Sometimes it’s pictures, I think. Sometimes, if you want to get really crazy, maybe it can have words AND pictures together! Woah. So can I put a video in my book? NO! Definitely not. Get videos out of our books, amiright? Sound? God, stop! That’s not even possible, silly. You can’t put videos and sounds on paper! And books are made of paper. With a spine and cover and pages you turn. Right?

Like a magazine! Pages. Spine. Words. Pictures. It has all the ingredients of what makes a book. Magazine, book. Book, magazine. A magazine must be a book. Huh? No! What are we saying, a magazine is most definitely not a book. Books don’t come in issues! What do you think we’re talking about comic..uhh…books? Wait. And what about Charles Dickens? His first books were published in monthly installments. Surely Charles Dickens wasn’t writing a book!

I read Alice and Wonderland on Project Gutenberg a few summers ago. A book, words, pages…made of HTML. Is that still a book? Can we get some HTML in our books? Is a website a book? The website I’ll publish this to has pages and words and pictures. Book?

And what about these e-books? Is an e-Pub file a book? E-pub can have video and sound. Is that still a book? Or is that an “e-book”? E-book is a silly term. We don’t call MP3s “e-music”; it’s just music. We don’t differentiate between formats. So what makes an e-book different from a book book? Why separate the formats? Is a book defined by its format or its content? The container or the substance? My head hurts.

Is a book a story? Does that exclude non-fiction? What if the story is five lines? Not-quite. Two pages? Too short? One hundred pages? Infinite Jest? How long does a story have to be to be a book? Is an essay a book? No, of course not. A collection of essays? Sure! Or is that a blog? Ugh. I don’t know what a book is anymore.

What is a book?

Blurry Edges and Leaky Containers

THE CONTAINER

I recently purchased David Foster Wallace’s novel Infinite Jest. I’ve been a fan of Wallace’s writing for a few years, mostly his non-fiction essays1 yet up until now, I didn’t have the courage to take the plunge into his magnum opus. Infinite Jest is a big book—coming in at 1104 pages, the paperback is almost two-inches thick. According to Amazon, it weighs two and a half pounds.

A book of that size commands attention—both mentally and physically. It has a mass and a weight. It takes up precious space on my bookshelf. My bookmark taunts me, always reminding me how much farther I still have to read. It’s intimidating. But it’s also not unapproachable.

And when I do finally finish, there’s a feeling of accomplishment. That space on my shelf now serves as an award of sorts, a medal of honor reserved for those who complete these two and half pounds of words. The bookmark comes out knowing I have read it all. It’s finished.

Read More

History Books

"Every new book I read comes to be a part of that overall and unitary book that is the sum of my readings. This does not come about without some effort: to compose that general book, each individual book must be transformed, enter into a relationship with the other books I have read previously, become their corollary or development or confutation or gloss or reference text."

—Italo Calvino, If On A Winter’s Night a Traveler

I’m moving to Brooklyn next week so my current apartment is in various states of disarray—the living room is empty save for a few boxes; the kitchen is cleaned and organized, each utensil and gadget categorized and placed in its respective box to make the move easier; the bedroom looks sparse, every surfaced washed of its life. Every surface except for the bookshelf.

I’ve been saving the bookshelf for last. If it wasn’t for my collection of books, I wouldn’t have much to pack at all. Aside of general living expenses, most of my money goes towards books. When I moved to New York a year ago, I had to decide what I could bring with me to my new, smaller apartment. My books automatically made the cut. I wanted to be near them, surrounded by them.

And now it’s time to pack them again to move across the river.

Read More