“Great art is when you come across an object and you have a fundamental, personal, one-on-one relationship with it, and you understand something you didn’t already understand about what it means to be alive. That’s why people with loads of money want to possess it. That’s why it’s worth so much fucking money. But it isn’t. They want to possess it. But they can’t. Throw money at art, you get nothing back. You die.”

—Damien Hirst

(via ubuwaits)

Tobias Bergdahl’s 12 Paradoxes of Graphic Design

A little Saturday night inspiration. Sometimes the truth hits you right in the face—every single one of these is perfect.

Tobias Bergdahl’s 12 Paradoxes of Graphic Design

A little Saturday night inspiration. Sometimes the truth hits you right in the face—every single one of these is perfect.

“Apple reaches for greatness without apology. Market share and profitability are important only as outcomes. They are not its purpose, which is to achieve the “insanely great.” It is as if they are on an ongoing Grail quest. (As Professor Henry Jones said to Indiana: “The search for the Grail is the search for the Divine in all of us.”)”

From a reader comment on Andrew Sullivan’s The Dish.

I love this. Money should never be the goal. The goal should be to do “insanely great” work, whatever that may be for you. I think doing good work is a lot easier than simply trying to get money. If you can do good work, money will follow. Reminds me of one of my favorite Walt Disney quotes: “We don’t make movies to make money. We make money to make more movies.”

Design firm Dowling | Duncan have submitted an interesting design to Richard Smith’s Dollar Rede$gn Project:
We wanted a concept behind the imagery so that the image directly relates to the value of each note. We also wanted the notes to be educational, not only for those living in America but visitors as well. Each note uses a black and white image depicting a particular aspect of American history and culture. They are then overprinted with informational graphics or a pattern relating to that particular image.
I really like the overall design and concept behind their proposal. I like the idea of each bill being educational and I like how each denomination is a different height making it easy to see what you have in a wallet. I’m especially attracted to the large monotone photography with subtle pattern overlays.
Nothing against President Obama, but I think George Washington would be a better choice for the one dollar bill as the first president and I find the use of Helvetica slightly ironic on an American dollar. You know I love Helvetica, but I wonder if something like Gotham would be a better fit? Either way, I love the design and it’s worth reading the concepts behind their proposal.

Design firm Dowling | Duncan have submitted an interesting design to Richard Smith’s Dollar Rede$gn Project:

We wanted a concept behind the imagery so that the image directly relates to the value of each note. We also wanted the notes to be educational, not only for those living in America but visitors as well. Each note uses a black and white image depicting a particular aspect of American history and culture. They are then overprinted with informational graphics or a pattern relating to that particular image.

I really like the overall design and concept behind their proposal. I like the idea of each bill being educational and I like how each denomination is a different height making it easy to see what you have in a wallet. I’m especially attracted to the large monotone photography with subtle pattern overlays.

Nothing against President Obama, but I think George Washington would be a better choice for the one dollar bill as the first president and I find the use of Helvetica slightly ironic on an American dollar. You know I love Helvetica, but I wonder if something like Gotham would be a better fit? Either way, I love the design and it’s worth reading the concepts behind their proposal.