Continuing with the Obama-themed posts tonight, the President has had the Oval Office redesigned. I’m impressed with the warm colors and the overall comfortable feel of the space and I especially love the rug with the presidential seal and quotes selected by the President. Always good to see good interior design in the highest office in the world.

Continuing with the Obama-themed posts tonight, the President has had the Oval Office redesigned. I’m impressed with the warm colors and the overall comfortable feel of the space and I especially love the rug with the presidential seal and quotes selected by the President. Always good to see good interior design in the highest office in the world.

This gallery of photos featuring various church sanctuaries from Dirk Wiedlein is completely inspiring. I believe sanctuaries should be spaces that cultivate, inspire and help facilitate worship but are more often than not, bland, unimaginative, and dated. This collection of images feature some creative interiors that I’m sure when standing inside them, would take your breath away.

I am absolutely in love with this Dwell profile on typographer Erik Spiekermann’s home in Berlin. I expected a clean, modern home from Spiekermann and his wife, both talented designers but this just completely blew me away. Everything is perfectly arranged and the mix of materials and finishes compliment each other perfectly. 
And besides, who doesn’t want a remote-controlled mountaineer harness to access your two-story bookshelf? Oh yes. So awesome.

I am absolutely in love with this Dwell profile on typographer Erik Spiekermann’s home in Berlin. I expected a clean, modern home from Spiekermann and his wife, both talented designers but this just completely blew me away. Everything is perfectly arranged and the mix of materials and finishes compliment each other perfectly. 

And besides, who doesn’t want a remote-controlled mountaineer harness to access your two-story bookshelf? Oh yes. So awesome.

Design Observer has a fantastic piece on House Industries creation of the recently released Eames Modern typeface:
So how does one go about turning a legend into a font? The roundabout way, apparently. “Charles and Ray Eames did not design a typeface,” explains the House Industries catalog. “But they did leave a philosophical template for a font collection worthy of their name.” Roat describes the process of sifting through the Eameses’ legacy as “exhaustive research and interaction with the Eames family” that was well worth the effort, as it “further clarified our mission to honor the Eames aesthetic while maintaining the timeless relevance and functionality that characterized their work.”
The Eames have long been one of my biggest sources of design inspiration as their work seamlessly spread across mediums with ease. Their mid-century modern aesthetic—function over form, simplicity, a focus on materials—is something I’d like to think I try to adhere to.  
Then, a few weeks ago, I attended a lecture by House Industries and I was extremely captivated by their process and approach, something I had previously know little about. As it turns out, they approach type design is a very similar way the Eames approached architecture, furniture design, films, and graphic design. The typeface they created to honor this iconic design couple is the perfect tribute. I’d can easily see myself incorporating this typeface into my work. 

Design Observer has a fantastic piece on House Industries creation of the recently released Eames Modern typeface:

So how does one go about turning a legend into a font? The roundabout way, apparently. “Charles and Ray Eames did not design a typeface,” explains the House Industries catalog. “But they did leave a philosophical template for a font collection worthy of their name.” Roat describes the process of sifting through the Eameses’ legacy as “exhaustive research and interaction with the Eames family” that was well worth the effort, as it “further clarified our mission to honor the Eames aesthetic while maintaining the timeless relevance and functionality that characterized their work.”

The Eames have long been one of my biggest sources of design inspiration as their work seamlessly spread across mediums with ease. Their mid-century modern aesthetic—function over form, simplicity, a focus on materials—is something I’d like to think I try to adhere to.  

Then, a few weeks ago, I attended a lecture by House Industries and I was extremely captivated by their process and approach, something I had previously know little about. As it turns out, they approach type design is a very similar way the Eames approached architecture, furniture design, films, and graphic design. The typeface they created to honor this iconic design couple is the perfect tribute. I’d can easily see myself incorporating this typeface into my work. 

This Interior Design Typography is just fantastic. Unfortunately, I can’t get much information on the background for the project or what it is for, but the details are simply stunning.

This Interior Design Typography is just fantastic. Unfortunately, I can’t get much information on the background for the project or what it is for, but the details are simply stunning.

Ikea is currently displaying select pieces of furniture in Paris subways as a way for customers to interact with the furniture before buying. The subway walls have also been adorned with large images of Ikea designed interiors. Not only is this a creative way for Ikea to advertise, it also completely changes the look of the Paris subway system.

Ikea is currently displaying select pieces of furniture in Paris subways as a way for customers to interact with the furniture before buying. The subway walls have also been adorned with large images of Ikea designed interiors. Not only is this a creative way for Ikea to advertise, it also completely changes the look of the Paris subway system.