After a small hiatus, issue 8 of Sway, the experimental zine I co-publish with Rory King is now out and available for download! For this issue, Rory and I were interested in exploring the idea of “dialogue” and wanted to take a different approach to the theme. Instead of each of us responding to the theme on our own, we decided to both work from the same source material and instead of responding to the theme of “dialogue”, we thought it’d be fun to use actual dialogue. We decided on a powerful scene from the second season finale of one of our favorite shows, Lost.

The result is two visual interpretations of the same scene and in my opinion, one of our best issues yet. I’m really, really happy with how this one turned out. Go take a look!

After a small hiatus, issue 8 of Sway, the experimental zine I co-publish with Rory King is now out and available for download! For this issue, Rory and I were interested in exploring the idea of “dialogue” and wanted to take a different approach to the theme. Instead of each of us responding to the theme on our own, we decided to both work from the same source material and instead of responding to the theme of “dialogue”, we thought it’d be fun to use actual dialogue. We decided on a powerful scene from the second season finale of one of our favorite shows, Lost.

The result is two visual interpretations of the same scene and in my opinion, one of our best issues yet. I’m really, really happy with how this one turned out. Go take a look!

The DHARMA Initiative Annual Report

Anyone who knows me knows I am an unashamed super-fan of the hit ABC show LOST. After flying through the first season on DVD three years ago in about three days, I was hooked. I quickly caught up and faithfully watched the final three seasons on television every week. I laughed, I cried, I mourned, and I celebrated with each characters as the story twisted and turned.

One of the final courses I’m taking before I graduate is a Corporate Publications class focusing on information graphics, annual reports, various promotional material. After have some experience in information graphics through my personal annual reports, I wanted to try something a bit different for the class.

I take the opportunity to approach each project as a way to explore another one of my interests and realized this was the perfect time to do a project around LOST.

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Lost

“I was trying to impress the audience with smart answers to life’s big questions,” he said. “It was all hype. But then I realized I didn’t have the answers to life’s big questions, and instead of writing plays that pretended to, I had to write plays that simply asked the right questions. I had to bring the audience up on stage with me, include them in the answering.” —From Jonathan Harris’s wonderful essay Baz

Like millions of other people around the world, I watched the Lost season finale last night and despite critics and blogs and tweets telling why I will be let down, I went into this final episode with the highest of expectations and full confidence that Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse will not disappoint me and craft a satisfying ending to what has been and will continue to be my favorite television show.

I’ve given a lot of time to Lost over the past few years. Aside from religiously watching every episode, I spent (wasted) countless hours reading theories, forums and interviews in an attempt to understand the mysteries and the myths. I enjoyed the lessons in physics and philosophy, the subtle references to great minds and the hidden books and clues that would help better understand the story the writers were telling us. And I don’t regret one minute of it.

Because in the end, to me, what I really kept coming back to episode after episode were the characters. Every single character I met in season one was flawed and broken and confused and lost. Like me. And like everyone else I know. These characters were real and I was seduced by their story. I celebrated with them. I mourned with them. I laughed with them. I cried with them. I spent six seasons with them.

And that’s why I remembered the passage I opened with from Jonathan Harris while Lost wrapped up last night. Throughout the six seasons the show asked questions of faith versus science, good versus evil, destiny versus random consequence, purpose versus and challenged out our perceptions of death, time, space, redemption and life. We all knew Lost would never answer everything and I think I like it better that way.

I found last night’s finale a poignant, moving and respectable way to honor the characters I’ve grown to love over the last few years. I laughed and cried and enjoyed every minute of it. They found redemption which is exactly what they were all searching for flying on Oceanic 815 back in the very first episode. Sure, every question wasn’t answered and some stories were left unresolved, but that’s how life is. And that’s how Lost is. Thanks for asking the right questions.

See you in another life, brother.

“It’s easy for people to say what they don’t want the show to be, it’s very difficult for them to say what they want the show to be. Carlton and I and the writers and everyone else who’s creatively involved - it’s it’s our job to figure out what the show is and not what the show isn’t. Usually, when we get criticisms, it’s along the lines of, “I really wish you hadn’t done that.” Or “I wish it had been different.” And you throw it back at them and ask, “Well, what did you want it to be?” And they say, “I wanted to see the statue built,” or “I wanted the Man in Black’s first name,” or “I want to know about the guy Sayid shot on the golf course.” Okay, that’s cool, you wanted those answers and we decided not to provide them to you. It’s not because we’re being cutesie, it’s because that that didn’t fit with our vision of the show. Right or wrong, we’re going to have to deal the rest of our lives with questions about how “Lost” ended. We’re comfortable with that, and at the end of the day, we have to remind people that we chose to end the show. We did not go on for a couple of more seasons and sort of pad it off to oblivion. And we knew we chose to end the show, that we were going to have to take our lumps. That’s fine as long as we’re happy with how we ended the show.”

—Damon Lindelof, co-writer and producer of LOST from this recent interview.

Fans of the show seem split going into the finale about whether or not Damon and Carlton can wrap this up in a satisfying way. I, for one, am very confident I will enjoy the finale and will serve as a meaningful ending to the best television show I have ever watched. These guys know what they are doing and I trust the ending they’ve planned. I can’t wait for tonight!